Easter at Abbotsbury

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Start of the Easter holidays and the countryside looks like a child’s painting – poster blue sky, brilliant yellow squares of oilseed rape contrasting with the undiluted emerald of winter wheat. White flakes of blackthorn blossom are melting to pastel green.

On Chesil Beach, families are picnicking, children enjoying the cereal-crunch of pebbles under their feet. At first the vast expanse of shingle looks featureless, then tiny flowers come into focus between the pebbles. The washed-out white of Sea Campion moving slightly in the breeze above mats of small fleshy blue-green leaves. Beneath each flower is a mauve-veined bladder-like calyx. Sea Campion is flowering early this year. Its dense mats help to stabilise the shingle. Scurvy grass shows up as sprinkling of white stars with tiny heart-shaped leaves.

A ragged hedge of tamarisk grows at the back of the beach, tangled and bare with shiny dark maroon branches. Some twigs are already spangled with green in the more sheltered parts of the thicket. In the past this tough plant was used to make lobster pots – its common name is Withy. On the edge of the tamarisk bank, architectural heads of the wild teasel grow tall – a honeycombed structure difficult to do justice to in a drawing. The lower couples of the leaf bases form a cup which collects rainwater. Insects drown in this reservoir and the dissolved remains are absorbed by the plant for sustenance.

Bordering the path on the landward side of the beach are swathes of strappy leaves – Babbington’s Leek. Later in the year these will produce long stems topped with balls of bright green seeds capped by a papery hood. Then a spray of white flowers will burst out forming a pom-pom on the top of the stem. This perennial plant, like many of Chesil’s, is edible.

Hardly noticeable amongst the pebbles is a creeping plant with small blue-green leaves – Sea Purslane secretes salt from its leaves forming minute crystals on the surface.

As I walk away from the beach towards the village the air is laden with a strong honey scent – meadowsweet with its sticky yellow cymes of flowers attracting the bumblebees. Comfrey is growing beside the stream, a medicinal herb sometimes called Boneset, Knitbone or Bruisewort. The verges are studded with spring flowers – pink campion, dead nettles and then, in the shade, a patch of bluebells. Soon the woods will be as blue as the sea.

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